Wirraway 260SL Motorhome: Review

By: Malcolm Street, Photography by: Malcolm Street

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Wirraway 260SL OPENER remove power lines

With a single bed layout and large offside slide-out, the Wirraway 260SL motorhome has room for all your travel escapades.

The Wirraway factory is located in Mildura, on the Victorian/New South Wales border. It’s a pleasant town, to say the least and, as I passed through on my way to Broken Hill, I asked Wirraway proprietor Rob Tonkin if he happened to have anything available for review. As it turned out, he had the 260SL model with single beds, rather than the more common island bed, and it’s interesting the difference it makes.


With Wirraway’s usual island bed layout, the bedhead is situated in the slide-out against the offside wall and the bed, subsequently, takes up a fair chunk of the rear. It’s surprising what a difference the single beds make. The motorhome can certainly be used with the slide-out closed up but, when it’s opened up, the result is enough room for a small dance floor – well, a dance floor for two, anyway.

Tasmanian myrtle timber or laminate is used for all the interior cabinetry work and the end result is very pleasing. Large roof hatches, generous window space and a glossy white ceiling all contribute to a light, bright interior.

Up front, the seating arrangement means you can sit back in comfort on the swivelling cab seats and watch the world go by through the cab windows or relax on the sideways facing lounge. The flatscreen TV is mounted midway along the nearside wall so it can be easily seen from either the seats or the beds in the rear. Two tables are supplied – one conventionally square for normal eating and the other, an hourglass shape, for nibblies and drinks. Both tables can be stored behind the lounge seat. Above the front seats, the cab is fully opened up and there are small cabinets on either side plus a clock centre-stage.


In the rear of the motorhome, each bed has a window, reading light, overhead lockers and, in the case of the offside bed, one drawer, while the opposite bed has three. Both beds also get a narrow shelf and a powerpoint above the pillow. Because of the slide-out, the overhead lockers above the offside bed are set lower than the non slide-out side. With the slide-out open, there is plenty of space between the beds but, as I noted earlier, it’s also possible to get between the beds with the slide-out closed up.


With this layout, the kitchen is split across the motorhome with the bench along the nearside wall and the fridge nestling between a full-height slide-out pantry and a full-height wardrobe. Fitted into the kitchen bench are the standard features such as a stainless steel sink with drainer and a four-burner cooktop with grill and oven below.

Not so standard are the seven drawers and under-bench slide-out pantry. The latter has an angled front which not only takes away the square look but also adds to the food storage space. Above the kitchen bench, there is just one overhead locker; the rest of the space is taken by the microwave and a locker which houses the satellite TV controls and a small shelf.


Across the rear, the bathroom comes with the full complement – nearside circular shower, offside cassette toilet and mid-area vanity cabinet. The window in the rear wall supplies light and ventilation and there is a neatly disguised ceiling vent above the shower cubicle.

In many RVs, the electrics, including switches and fuses, are often in odd places – usually a location which suits the manufacturer rather than the user. In the Wirraway, most of the essentials are either located above the doorway, down the panel beside the doorway, or in a cabinet below that. In short, they’re very convenient for the end user.

All the Wirraway lighting is energy efficient LEDs. Keeping the two 120Ah batteries charged up are a 25A smart charger, the vehicle alternator and, in this case, optional solar panels. Controlling all those items, in addition to security lighting, event timing and automatic filling of the drinking water tank, are an EC200 control panel (above the doorway) and the accompanying EC325 power supply. In essence, it’s a case of set and forget! 


The Wirraway 260SL’s layout demonstrates that a single bed setup can offer considerable flexibility in a motorhome. There’s no doubt the slide-out also creates a huge amount of internal space but the single bed design works equally well with the slide-out closed up, or even with no slide-out at all. Sure, there would be less internal space but there would otherwise be no compromises.


I liked…

  • Flexibility of single bed layout
  • Nicely setup electrics
  • Flat floor layout
  • Remote-controlled external bin design
  • External table above bin and slide-out barbecue

I would have liked...

  • Larger kitchen but not much else really

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The full test appears in Caravan World #540 August 2015. Subscribe today for the latest caravan reviews and news every month!